Monday, October 30, 2017

Halloween Food Safety Tips For Parents

Even though it’s not an official holiday, Halloween is much beloved by children and adults alike. What could be more fun than trick-or-treating, apple bobbing, or costume parties?
To make sure treats are safe for children, follow these simple steps:Halloween Pumpkin with candy
  • Snacking: Children shouldn’t snack on treats from their goody bags while they’re out trick-or-treating. Give them a light meal or snack before they head out – don’t send them out on an empty stomach. Urge them to wait until they get home and let you inspect their loot before they eat any of it.
  • Safe treats: Tell children not to accept – and especially not to eat – anything that isn’t commercially wrapped. Inspect commercially wrapped treats for signs of tampering, such as an unusual appearance or discoloration, tiny pinholes, or tears in wrappers. Throw away anything that looks suspicious.
  • Food Allergies: If your child has a food allergy, check the label to ensure the allergen isn’t present. Do not allow the child to eat any home-baked goods he or she may have received.
  • Choking hazards: If you have very young children, be sure to remove any choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys.
Bobbing for apples is an all-time favorite Halloween game. Here are a couple of ways to say “boo” to bacteria that can cause foodborne illness.
  • Reduce the number of bacteria that might be present on apples and other raw fruits and vegetables by thoroughly rinsing them under cool running water. As an added precaution, use a produce brush to remove surface dirt.
  • Try this new spin on apple bobbing from FightBAC.org: Cut out lots of apples from red construction paper. On each apple, write activities for kids, such as “do 5 jumping jacks.” Place a paper clip on each apple and put them in a large basket. Tie a magnet to a string. Let the children take turns “bobbing” with their magnet and doing the activity written on their apple. Give children a fresh apple for participating.
If your idea of Halloween fun is a party at home, don’t forget these tips:
  • Beware of spooky cider! Unpasteurized juice or cider can contain harmful bacteria such as Salmonella. To stay safe, always serve pasteurized products at your parties.
  • No matter how tempting, don't taste raw cookie dough or cake batter that contain uncooked eggs.
  • “Scare" bacteria away by keeping all perishable foods chilled until serving time. These include finger sandwiches, cheese platters, fruit or tossed salads, cold pasta dishes with meat, poultry, or seafood, and cream pies or cakes with whipped-cream and cream-cheese frostings.
  • Bacteria will creep up on you if you let foods sit out too long. Don’t leave perishable goodies out of the fridge for more than two hours (1 hour in temperatures above 90°F).

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

October Is National Cyber Security Awareness Month


Each and every one of us needs to do our part to make sure that our online lives are kept safe and secure. That's what National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) – observed in October – is all about!


Friday, October 20, 2017

Breast Cancer Awareness Month



October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. We're doing our part to help. Here's a link with more information on how you can too, as well as educate yourself and others...

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Get Smart About Credit Day!


We're a proud participant of Get Smart About Credit day! In conjunction with other bankers across the nation we're visiting local schools to teach lessons on how to use credit effectively, understanding the importance of critical financial skills including paying for college, managing money, protecting your identity and careers in banking.

Bankers Celebrate Get Smart About Credit Day, Promote Financial Literacy

Bankers visit classrooms across the country on Oct. 20 to teach credit education

​WASHINGTON — Bankers across the country are celebrating the American Bankers Association Foundation’s Get Smart About Credit Day today by visiting high school classrooms to teach teens how to use credit effectively.
 
Get Smart About Credit Day, celebrated annually on the third Thursday of October, is part of the ABA Foundation’s larger financial education initiative. The program encourages bankers to present lessons on important financial obstacles facing young adults, including paying for college, knowing their credit score, managing money and protecting their identity.
 
Through Get Smart About Credit, nearly 5,000 bankers will deliver financial education lessons to more than 164,000 teens this year. These presentations are scheduled to take place in every U.S. state, as well as the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. 
 
“Financial education is essential to building a generation of smart money managers,” said Corey Carlisle, executive director of the ABA Foundation. “We’re proud our programs, like Get Smart About Credit, both encourage and support bankers in bringing those critical lessons to their local communities.”  
 
The American Bankers Association marked the day by co-hosting a Get Smart About Credit lesson with Burke & Herbert Bank at West Potomac High School in Alexandria, Va. ABA President and CEO Rob Nichols, alongside Burke & Herbert Bank Senior Vice President Joseph F. Collum, presented lessons on using credit wisely to approximately 60 junior and senior students.  
 
This year, Get Smart About Credit is sponsored by Citi, TD Bank, U.S. Bank and Wells Fargo. 
 
To encourage banker participation, the ABA Foundation offers free informational webinars, as well as lesson plans, program materials and real-time customer support. 
 
Registered banks are featured on a list of participating banks on the ABA Foundation’s website and in press materials. Since 1997, the ABA Foundation’s financial education programs have reached over 8.9 million young people with the help of more than 225,000 banker volunteers.
 
About ABA
The American Bankers Association is the voice of the nation’s $16 trillion banking industry, which is composed of small, regional and large banks that together employ more than 2 million people, safeguard $12 trillion in deposits and extend more than $8 trillion in loans.
 
About the ABA Foundation
Through its leadership, partnerships, and national programs, ABA’s Community Engagement Foundation (dba ABA Foundation), a 501(c)3, helps bankers provide financial education to individuals at every age, elevate issues around affordable housing and community development, and achieve corporate social responsibility objectives to improve the well-being of their customers and their communities.
 

Monday, October 16, 2017

Phishing Scams: On The Rise And How To Spot Them


Even if you have security software, phishing is a serious threat, one that can expose you to ransomware. Here's how to avoid these dangerous emails.



Anti-Virus Software: What Is It And What Is Right For You Lately, every moment of every day brings outrageous news of the latest cyber ca...